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Saturday, April 18, 2015

Vox Planetarium released on Wirrpang Records

I'm pleased to announce that my low-flutes-with-electronics piece Vox Planetarium, commissioned by Peter Sheridan, has just been released on Wirripang Records in Australia. The CD, entitled "Labyrinths of Lowness", was recorded by the Monash University Flute Ensemble from Melbourne, Australia.



I'm also pleased to announce that I'll be conducting the U.S. premiere of Vox Planetarium this August at the National Flute Convention in Washington DC, featuring Peter and a host of other world-class flutists.

To listen to excerpts from the disc, or to purchase a copy, visit Wirripang on the web.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

"Music You Should Know" – Part 1

I have several young private composition students I teach regularly, and then during the summer I work closely with a handful of students at the Csehy Summer School of Music. One thing I've consistently found is that these young students are for the most part completely unaware of what contemporary classical music sounds like, looks like, who's writing it, and who's playing it. Which is perplexing to me, since not only is discovering who the current composers and players are totally exciting, but also totally inspiring to the creative juices. Many students seem to think that new music in 2015 is basically what it was in 1955, which is like saying that pop music today sounds like it did 60 years ago—actually, nothing could be more different.

But another thing that is different these days is the immediate accessibility of new music: on You Tube, on Soundcloud, on Band Camp, on internet radio, or just on plain old blogs and web sites, compelling new music is really everywhere, if you just know to look for it. Even scores, which used to seem hidden away in some obscure, secret place like treasure maps, are profoundly available in a way that would have once seemed miraculous. Hearing new music, seeing new music, studying new music.... we live in an age of plenty.

So, in order to get these young people current with what's going on now — and what has gone on in the last 60 years — I'm putting together a series of You Tube playlists called "Music You Should Know", containing a bunch of videos of, you know. Each playlist will be defined by a (very) broad category to group things together in some kind of organized way. No doubt the very subjective act of categorization will be cause for some debate.... I hope it is! Getting students conversant enough with this music to develop points of view and questions is the whole point. I've had students become enthusiastic upon encountering things as different as Music for 18 Musicians on one hand, and Vox Balaenae on the other.

Playlist one is Minimalism & Post-Modernism (or PoMo for short). A very fun list to compile, and a good example of the wide range of music that can come in under a fairly wide umbrella: it has Arvo Pärt next to Michael Gordon, and Eliane Radigue next to Michael Nyman. Teasing out the connecting threads between these very different musics are part of what makes new music so much fun.

Listen to "Music You Should Know: Minimalism & Postmodernism"

Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Whiplash

Posts have been few and far between lately — too busy writing and playing! — but the erudite Ethan Iverson and I exchanged some email regarding Hank Levy and Buddy Rich, spinning off of his post on Rich's show drumming legacy that was made so much of in the recent Whiplash movie. I related to Ethan one of Hank's favorite stories, regarding the one time where Hank and Buddy happened to intersect. You can read the original post here (an excellent read, and simpatico with many of my thoughts on the subject), and Ethan posted my correspondence with him here.

Speaking of Whiplash (one of Hank Levy's great odd-meter scores), I didn't bring this out in the discussion with Ethan, but I did most of the editing of a newly-published edition of the original score of Whiplash as recorded by Don Ellis, with the help of Nick DiScala. It's part of the Don Ellis Critical Editions series published by University of Northern Colorado Press, and is available here. It is the definitive, original, annotated edition of Whiplash, with full score and parts, and is the first place anyone should look to find the real thing.

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Clay Jenkins performs "Tray-Bo"

Here's a recent video of Clay Jenkins performing his original tune Tray-Bo at Columbus State University in 2012. I arranged this big band chart for him a few years ago when he was our featured guest artist at Roberts Wesleyan College, and since then he's performed it wherever he goes.

Monday, October 14, 2013

Upcoming feature on Composer's Circle

Composers Circle
I will be the featured composer of the day on ComposersCircle.com, this coming Saturday, October 19! Composers Circle is a great site to experience fresh new music of young composers from around the world. I've discovered a lot of great writers there who were previously unknown to me. I consider it a great privilege to be featured on the site for a day!

Please visit the site on Saturday and enjoy the music.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Bow Shock

Here's a new recording of Bow Shock, for violin and piano, featuring the Irrera Brothers.


A review from the premiere performance is here.

Monday, May 6, 2013

Premiere of "Skies Over Fairport"

Here is last Friday's premiere of Skies Over Fairport, written for the combined forces of the Fairport High School Jazz Band and the SOUL-JAZZ Big Band.

We concluded the program with the Ellington-Basie version of Take The A Train.

Tuesday, April 30, 2013

dying and dancing - score preview

Here's a preview of the dying and dancing euphonium solo, which was premiered at the North Eastern Regional Tuba Euphonium conference in April.



Saturday, April 20, 2013

Bow Shock Review

From New York Concert Review, February 26, 2013:

"The second half opened with the World Premiere of “Bow Shock” by Russell Scarbrough (b. 1972). Written for the Irrera Brothers in 2012, this is a work that showcases their individual and duo talents to the hilt. The composer in his program notes stated, “the term ‘Bow Shock’ comes from the field of aerodynamics and refers to a curved shock wave that proceeds a solid body moving through the atmosphere at supersonic speeds. It’s a great image for this music…and I couldn’t resist the double-entendre with the word ‘bow’.” It is a jazz-tinged, driving, hyper-energetic work that invites the listener to fasten his seatbelt for the ride. It was a win-win-win: the Irreras can be well pleased that this work shows them to such great advantage. Scarbrough should be delighted with such accomplished musicians giving his music such a dynamic performance. Finally, the listener gets the best of both worlds!"

Read the whole review here.

Thursday, April 18, 2013

World Premiere of "dying and dancing"

euphonium
This Saturday, April 20 at 10am, Mark Kellogg and Joseph Werner will perform the world premiere of my new work for euphonium & piano, dying and dancing, at the Northeast Regional Tuba & Euphonium Conference at Ithaca College.